House of Mind

"Biology gives you a brain. Life turns it into a mind" - Jeffrey Eugenides

  • 20th October
    2011
  • 20
ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

donnawillismdmph:

Innovation: MRI-based technique allows researchers to non-invasively follow  stem cells in vivo.
Neural stem cells are born deep in an area of the brain called the  subventricular zone. As time goes on, the cells, also called  neuroblasts, make their way to other areas of the brain where they  mature into functioning neurons. The brain’s ability to regenerate its  cells is of great interest to scientists.
The MRI could be used to develop treatments for brain injury  caused by trauma, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, and other neurological  disorders.
Eric Ahrens, associate professor of biological sciences at Carnegie Mellon University.

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

donnawillismdmph:

Innovation: MRI-based technique allows researchers to non-invasively follow stem cells in vivo.

Neural stem cells are born deep in an area of the brain called the subventricular zone. As time goes on, the cells, also called neuroblasts, make their way to other areas of the brain where they mature into functioning neurons. The brain’s ability to regenerate its cells is of great interest to scientists.

The MRI could be used to develop treatments for brain injury caused by trauma, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, and other neurological disorders.

Eric Ahrens, associate professor of biological sciences at Carnegie Mellon University.

  • 31st May
    2011
  • 31
Potential New Drug Candidate Found for Alzheimer’s Disease

ucsdhealthsciences:

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the Medical University of South Carolina and American Life Science Pharmaceuticals of San Diego have demonstrated that oral administration of a cysteine protease inhibitor, E64d, not only reduces the build-up of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brains of animal models for Alzheimer’s disease, but also results in a substantial improvement in memory deficit.  (More here)

From the news release: 

Increased Aβ levels in the brain are associated with the development of memory loss and amyloid plaque, the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease.  Aβ peptides are “cut” out from a larger protein called the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by an enzymatic “scissor” called β-secretase, and aggregate to form plaques in the brain regions responsible for memory. 

E64d reduces Aβ by inhibiting the β-secretase “scissors” from “cutting” the APP chain into smaller toxic Aβ peptides. But in this study, the researchers found that the compound actually increases the activity of a protease called BACE1 which, to date, has been regarded as the primary β-secretase.  Instead, E64d appears to lower brain Aβ by inhibiting the β-secretase activity of another protease, Cathepsin B.

  • 12th April
    2010
  • 12
Psychedelic Science: Hallucinogens as Treatment for Psychiatric Disorders

Doctors are giving psychedelics a second look after scientists won permission to study hallucinogens’ potential for treating some mental disorders. Patients diagnosed with depression have reported that after taking hallucinogens, their lives have gained more meaning and their relationships with family/loved ones have improved. 

Researchers from around the world are gathering this week in San Jose, Calif., for the largest conference on psychedelic science held in the United States in four decades. They plan to discuss studies of psilocybin and other psychedelics for treating depression in cancer patients, obsessive-compulsive disorder, end-of-life anxiety,post-traumatic stress disorder and addiction to drugs or alcohol.”