House of Mind

"Biology gives you a brain. Life turns it into a mind" - Jeffrey Eugenides

  • 25th February
    2011
  • 25
Axoplasmic Transport of Neurotransmitter Vesicles
Simply put, axonal transport is the cellular mechanism responsible for transporting or trafficking cell parts to and from the cell body, or soma. Many proteins and particularly vesicles are made in the cell body but are needed elsewhere in the neuron. Naturally, this ability to transport essential cell components back and forth from the axon is critical for the neuron’s ability to survive, grow and function.
So how exactly do vesicles move? Conveniently enough, they get help from “motors” that are made up of complex protein interactions. Like I mentioned before, transport in the neuron is bidirectional, and different motor protein complexes are associated with a particular direction.  Kinesins take care of forward (anterograde) transport while dyneins take care of backward (retrograde) transport. Lastly, motor protein complexes need something to be “anchored” to, right? That’s where microtubules come in. Microtubules provide the tracks along which these motor proteins move along “carrying” the vesicle or other cell parts. 
Once the vesicles are where they need to be (usually in the synaptic cleft), other things like neurotrophic factors may assist in vesicular release and re-uptake related to synaptic transmission. 

Axoplasmic Transport of Neurotransmitter Vesicles

Simply put, axonal transport is the cellular mechanism responsible for transporting or trafficking cell parts to and from the cell body, or soma. Many proteins and particularly vesicles are made in the cell body but are needed elsewhere in the neuron. Naturally, this ability to transport essential cell components back and forth from the axon is critical for the neuron’s ability to survive, grow and function.

So how exactly do vesicles move? Conveniently enough, they get help from “motors” that are made up of complex protein interactions. Like I mentioned before, transport in the neuron is bidirectional, and different motor protein complexes are associated with a particular direction.  Kinesins take care of forward (anterograde) transport while dyneins take care of backward (retrograde) transport. Lastly, motor protein complexes need something to be “anchored” to, right? That’s where microtubules come in. Microtubules provide the tracks along which these motor proteins move along “carrying” the vesicle or other cell parts. 

Once the vesicles are where they need to be (usually in the synaptic cleft), other things like neurotrophic factors may assist in vesicular release and re-uptake related to synaptic transmission. 

  1. itsamadseasonnn reblogged this from houseofmind and added:
    Been studying this the whole freaking day………
  2. ajazzualsuspect reblogged this from houseofmind
  3. soul-and-onward reblogged this from houseofmind and added:
    such a simple and perfect rendering. i wish i had this last semester for one of my neuroscience presentations!
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  13. mcmikeyliu reblogged this from houseofmind and added:
    so that’s how it works!
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