House of Mind

"Biology gives you a brain. Life turns it into a mind" - Jeffrey Eugenides

  • 9th May
    2014
  • 09
Hi, I read an article a while ago about a study done in the late 90s/early 2000s that if you shone light flashes against the back of the knee, it would help correct sleep cycles/circadian rhythms. Do you know anymore about this? I couldn't find much on this topic. The reason why I'm so interested is because I have terrible ass-backwards sleep cycle, which when corrected, corrects itself back towards night-owl patterns. Any research on this stuff? Much thanks.

Asked by: the-virgin-and-virgil

  • 9th May
    2014
  • 09
Neuroscience is exciting. Understanding how thoughts work, how connections are made, how the memory works, how we process information, how information is stored - it’s all fascinating.
Lisa Randall
  • 1st May
    2014
  • 01
  • 30th April
    2014
  • 30
Early Life Trauma and Attachment: Immediate and Enduring Effects on Neurobehavioral and Stress Ax...

Above is a link that provides full access to my first review (and thesis intro chapter) :) 

  • 29th April
    2014
  • 29
Hi! Would you happen to know if it's absolutely mandatory to have majored in something related to biology to be able to apply for a neuroscience/neuropsychology graduate degree? I'm majoring in education and would eventually love to go back to grad school so I could be able to learn & do more research about the learning process in the brain and how these discoveries could be applied to classrooms or modify my country's educational system, but I'm not sure if they'd accept me. What do you think?

Asked by: intramural

Hi, thanks for your question. 

This appears to be the source of a lot of doubt for other readers as well, so I’ll set the record straight: You do NOT need to have a Biology or Psychology degree in order to apply for a Neuroscience PhD program. 

Of course, these are the more “typical” majors, but they are by no means a requirement or even a guarantee of admission. In addition, the focus of different graduate programs tend to vary by institutions. For example, some graduate centers are focused on systems neuroscience, others care more about development, while others are even more interdisciplinary than the usual. A fellow classmate of mine double majored in biology and education and she was admitted to NYU’s graduate program and is doing well. 

Summary: Do not think of your “nontraditional” background as a weakness. 

Also, your interest is in an area that many others care about too. Just look at this: NYU Neuroscience and Education Lab

Good luck!

HoM

  • 29th April
    2014
  • 29
Hi! I'm an undergrad neuroscience student. I see that you've posted pretty recently; is your blog still active? I hope your research is going well :) It must be exciting to be working on your doctorate.

Asked by: deathtasteslikechicken

Hi!

The blog was on some sort of a hiatus while I powered through my projects. My research is going well, thanks for your kind wishes :)   I am about a year (or less) to be done, so it has been quite a busy time for me in lab. I recently published a review article (link soon) and a commentary on a cool research paper. 

Can’t wait until my first author publication!

Best,

HoM